You can’t vote in the November 3 Election by registering on this site. To register or update your voter registration for the November 3 general election, you must go to your city or township clerk's office as soon as possible, but no later than 8 p.m. on Election Day. You can vote during the same visit. Here is what you need to bring with you.

Accessible voting


This page contains information about accessible voting. To learn more about voting rights for voters with disabilities, visit The Rights of Voters with Disabilities.

Call the clerk's office ahead of time to make sure your voting site is free of obstructions. If your site isn’t accessible, you will be directed to an alternative site that is. Hearing impaired residents with questions may contact the Department of State's Bureau of Elections by email at elections@michigan.gov.

The Bureau of Elections now has an Ombudsperson for Accessible Elections to respond to and assist individuals with disabilities attempting to vote. To speak with the Ombudsperson for Accessible Elections, call 800-292-5973 ext. 3 or email MDOS-ADAVoting@michigan.gov.


How do I apply for an accessible absentee ballot?

Voters with print disabilities may apply for an accessible electronic absent voter ballot that can be completed electronically, printed, and returned to the local clerk. To apply online for an accessible electronic absent voter ballot, click here.


How do I vote in person with an accessible machine?

All voters, including voters with disabilities, have access to a Voter Assist Terminal in all polling places. The Voter Assist Terminal helps the voter mark a ballot. It will mark the ballot with the voter's choices but does not tally the votes. Once the ballot is marked, it is counted in exactly the same fashion as all other ballots.


What equipment will I use?

Voting systems can vary from county to county, so learn about what to expect before you arrive.

View specific information about voting equipment in your county.

Hart voting systems
ES&S voting systems
Dominion voting systems


What to expect outside the polling place

You have the right to an accessible polling place and an accessible voting machine.

If it is Election Day, send someone into the polling place to request curbside voting on your behalf. The election officials will bring a ballot outside so you can vote.

Election officials must consider accessibility outside the polling place. You should expect:

  • Unblocked doorways
  • Alternatives to stairs such as ramps or elevators


What to expect inside the polling place

You have the right to vote independently using an accessible voting machine. If you would like to use an accessible voting machine, tell an election official when you arrive to vote.

You have the right to assistance from the election officials. You can ask the election officials for instructions on how to use the voting equipment or assistance at any time, even after you’ve entered the voting booth.

If you are blind, disabled, or unable to read or write, you have the right to assistance from anyone you choose. However, the person cannot be:

  • Your employer
  • An agent of your employer
  • An officer or agent of your labor union

Election officials must consider accessibility inside the polling place. You should find:

  • Adequate lighting and seating
  • At least 1 voting station that can accommodate a person who is seated
  • Access to a Voter Assist Terminal


Language access

If you vote in Colfax Township or the City of Fennville, you have the right to a ballot and election materials in Spanish.

If you vote in the City of Hamtramck, you have the right to a ballot and election materials in Bengali.

If you do not read or write English and a ballot is not available in your language, you have the right to assistance from anyone you choose. However, the person cannot be:

  • Your employer
  • An agent of your employer
  • An officer or agent of your labor union


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